Political jargon …

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Ok … I’m guilty. I listen to political talk radio and television way too much. Hey, I’m practically having relationships with pundits and news anchors. And goodness knows I love a rousing debate. What I also find pretty interesting is what I call politispeak … the jargon of politics. Do any of these sound familiar?

“At the end of the day
Geez… everyone seems to know what will happen at the end of the day – the proverbial “wrap-up” phrase which I find to be hilarious. Know what actually happens at the end of my day? A really good cocktail.DemocraticLogo

“The fact of the matter”
Oh this is good. What fact are they referring to exactly? This expression often precedes a diatribe from one side or the other which covers talking points and serious partisan rhetoric about that darn matter. Maybe it’s just time filler… a breath catcher, if you will.

“Fundamentally flawed”
This is a big favorite since I love alliteration and this expression says “Your idea sucks” in such a polite way.

“The American People want”
Now there is a broad brush expression if I ever heard one, and it’s one that many people use. The fact of the matter is (sorry, I couldn’t resist but this is true) we are seriously divided as to what we want … and no one side can claim to know what The American People really want unless some bipartisan legislation has a 70-80% approval rate (I highly doubt it).

“The war on …”
Apparently we are always fighting a war on or about something … women, race, taxes, religion, drugs, 16 oz soft drinks. Pick your noun and head for the bunker as a war may very well be declared on it.

“With all due respect”
This one is very entertaining and generally precedes a real clear insult to the opposing side. After all,  one can hardly say “I’m going to be disrespectful to you and your ridiculous p.o.v. right now”, so one uses the disclaimer to sugar coat the diss. Then pow!     *rolls eyes*

“Frankly”
Does this really mean one is about to be candid or honest?

“The folks”
Ah yes, we are often referred to as folks. Is this a warm and fuzzy colloquialism for the American people? Or is it referring to commoners? Because in my world “folks” means my parents. I’m just sayin’.

“Bailout”
Let’s see. We had the auto bailout, the bank bailout and the Mac and Mae bailout. Since when did a term associated with doing (or not doing) jail time become synonymous with government lending paid for by the taxpayers?

“Too big to fail”
This is the ever famous theory which asserts that certain corporations, particularly financial institutions, are so large and so interconnected that their failure would be disastrous to the greater economic system, and they therefore must be supported by government when they face potential failure. Oy vey.

In my view, we are currently experiencing the most polarized political debate in decades, with rhetoric on both sides of the political aisle (ah…another interesting term) at an all time fever pitch. I can only hope things will calm down so the changes that this nation so desperately needs can actually get accomplished. As “the folks” used to say, actions speak louder than words.

(Laughs … instead of cries)

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